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Human Metabolism (Core A)

Human Metabolism I Mouse Metabolism and Imaging I Genetics and Genomics


John Shepherd and Alka Kanaya, co-Directors

The Human Metabolism Core consists of a number of services that provide consulting with study design, subject recruitment, and statistical analyses (service area 1), conducting clinical research (service area 2), and an array of specialized NORC-focused methods, instruments, and facilities for human body composition/metabolism (service area 3), radiologic imaging (service area 4) and biobehavioral measurements (service area 5) that enable several aspects of research into human nutrition, obesity and metabolism at UCSF.


NORC members wishing to benefit from NORC support when accessing these services please complete this and submit to Alka Kanaya (Alka.Kanaya@ucsf.edu& John Shepherd (John.Shepherd@ucsf.edu)
 

Services Supported by the NORC Human Metabolism


Service Area 1: CTSI Consultation Services

Provides a diverse array of general services to support human research (study design, patient recruitment, biostatistics, bioinformatics and data management) as well 16 more specific services related to human clinical research.


Service Area 2: CTSI Clinical Research Services

Provides clinical research support services, including nursing, phlebotomy and sample processing for in- and out-patient studies.


Service Area 3: Body Composition, Exercise and Metabolism

Provides specialized expertise and equipment to characterizes clinical research participants and provides important outcomes for research in nutrition, obesity and metabolism.


Service Area 4: Radiology; MRI and NMR and associated services

Provides advanced, capabilities to conduct and interpret non-invasive imaging of research participants for tissue distributions and metabolic activities of high relevance to research into nutrition, obesity and metabolism.


Service Area 5: BioBehavioral Measurement

Provides advanced tools for defining methods to investigate behavioral factors (e.g. diet, physical activity, stress, etc.) impacting clinical outcomes.


 

CENTER MEMBERS ARE REMINDED TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE UCSF NORC GRANT CONTRIBUTION IN THEIR PUBLICATION (P30DK098722)